DIY - home improvement basics

Home improvement is a noble task. Through cleaning, fixing, and organizing, one can greatly improve their mindset and quality of life. But with sidings that need pressure washing, broken windows, and that beautiful kitchen counter, home improvement can also be very expensive! Luckily, there are several “do it yourself” tasks that can be completed without hiring professionals or spending hundreds on supplies. Following are a few do it yourself basics to help get you further on your way to that perfect house. So get to it – do it yourself!

  • Remember that do it yourself remodeling and redecorating can be a long, arduous process. It’s easy to get excited and start tearing down walls or ripping out sinks, but when the actual work begins, many people quickly remember why they used to hire someone to do it for them.
  • Always use caution with power tools, ladders, and the like. Always read instruction manuals. Wear work gloves when handling rough or splintery material, but do not wear them when operating a power tool. Roll your sleeves as well. It’s no good to do it yourself if you get hurt! Keep safety glasses on hand in all the areas that are under construction, and replace any that get scratchy as soon as possible. Double vision is very bad for home improvement and repair.
  • Do it yourself in one area at a time! It can be stressful just to have one room of the house under construction and virtually unusable. You certainly don’t want your entire house that way. Having several rooms in a state of remodeling is depressing, and this can present itself in a number of ways. You feel weird about having people over; you argue with your spouse about the lack of help, it's just not a good idea.
  • Keep home safety in mind! You may be using a large amount of power tools, outlets, and appliances, which always require extra caution and diligence, whether you are working on a DIY project or not. With your family, come up with a practical escape plan should there be an emergency. Install smoke and carbon monoxide detectors if you don’t have them already. Have furnaces, boilers, and similar appliances checked at least once yearly for carbon monoxide.
  • It won't hurt you to sit in on a class at the local home improvement store. If you are a professional carpenter or other construction provider, great, maybe there is something you can bring to the class. If you built a really nice cabinet in wood shop when you were fifteen, you might want to check these out. Virtually all of them provide free Saturday classes on laying tile, carpeting, building decks and the like. It takes anywhere from one to four hours out of your day and you could learn something new and maybe even get the chance to join a "club" where they take turns helping each other on the weekends. It improves a sense of community along with your home.